02112011: WWW Wednesdays (1)

WWW Wednesdays is a weekly meme hosted by Should Be Reading.
To play along, just answer the following three questions:
– What are you currently reading?
– What did you recently finish reading?
– What do you think you’ll read next?
What am I currently reading?


I have just picked up Shades of Grey by Jasper Fforde again after leaving it for a while to finish a book for my college book club and I absolutely love it, I’m just over half way through and recommend it to all.

“Hundreds of years in the future, after the Something that Happened, the world is an alarmingly different place. Life is lived according to The Rulebook and social hierarchy is determined by your perception of colour. Eddie Russett is an above average Red who dreams of moving up the ladder by marriage to Constance Oxblood. Until he is sent to the Outer Fringes where he meets Jane – a lowly Grey with an uncontrollable temper and a desire to see him killed. For Eddie, it’s love at first sight. But his infatuation will lead him to discover that all is not as it seems in a world where everything that looks black and white is really shades of grey… If George Orwell had tripped over a paint pot or Douglas Adams favoured colour swatches instead of towels . . . neither of them would have come up with anything as eccentrically brilliant as Shades of Grey.”

What did I recently finish reading?
Yesterday I finished Little Gypsy by Roxy Freeman which is a memoir, keep a look out for my review over the next couple of days.
Born in 1979, Roxy Freeman grew up travelling around Ireland and England in a horse-drawn wagon with her mother and father and five siblings. Life was harsh but it was a childhood of freedom spent in harmony with nature. Roxy didn’t know her time-tables but she could milk a goat, ride a horse and cook dinner on an open fire before she was ten. But when the family came to England, they faced prejudice and hostility and Roxy started receiving the unwelcome attentions of a family friend known as ‘Uncle Tony’, which she endured in secret for years. Then, one day, she told the police about Tony and a manhunt ensued for the man newspapers dubbed ‘Britain’s most-wanted paedophile’. Despite all of her difficulties, Roxy developed a passion for music and her dancing skills took her around the world. This beautifully written story is a frank portrait of an extraordinary life, and a unique insight into the lives of girls born into traveller communities.”


What do I think I’ll read next?

Honestly I think I’ll knuckle down with The Asylum for Wayward Victorian Girls by Emilie Autumn whilst I’m at home as I’ve had it on the go for over a year now but because it’s so good and beautiful I haven’t wanted to finish it. I feel it’s due to come to an end soon.


Presenting Emilie Autumn’s long awaited autobiographical, reality-bending thriller, “The Asylum for Wayward Victorian Girls.” This beautifully bound hardcover volume measures 8″ x 11.5″ and clocks in at a massive 274 fully illustrated pages. Positively packed with hand-written memoirs, photos, and paintings, this profoundly empowering epic not only deserves a place on your tea table, it is also one of the most complete accounts of bipolar disorder ever penned, and will take readers behind the doors of both modern day psych ward and Victorian insane asylum in this true life horror tale of madness, murder, and medical experimentation. But reader beware: It’s much easier to get into the Asylum than it is to get out.”


I will also be reading The Shining by Stephen King on buses (the previous book mentioned is much too heavy and large, not to mention precious, for me to be lugging back and forth from college) as I was supposed to read it last month for a book club on goodreads but was left abandoned when I was bombarded with three deadlines at once.

“First published in 1977, The Shining quickly became a benchmark in the literary career of Stephen King. This tale of a troubled man hired to care for a remote mountain resort over the winter, his loyal wife, and their uniquely gifted son slowly but steadily unfolds as secrets from the Overlook Hotel’s past are revealed, and the hotel itself attempts to claim the very souls of the Torrence family. Adapted into a cinematic masterpiece of horror by legendary Stanley Kubrick — featuring an unforgettable performance by a demonic Jack Nicholson –The Shining stands as a cultural icon of modern horror, a searing study of a family torn apart, and a nightmarish glimpse into the dark recesses of human weakness and dementia.”

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